Tag Archives: EyjaFjarðaráll Rift

More Trembles in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone

Good Evening!

A large earthquake swarm started in Iceland in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone (TFZ) on 19 June 2020, still ongoing at the time of writing.  The Civil Protection Authority, Iceland, has declared a state of uncertainty; the TFZ is capable of producing large destructive earthquakes. 

The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) has reported that over 9,000 earthquakes have been detected by their SIL earthquake monitoring system.  The swarm includes three earthquakes over 5.0: on 20/06/2020 a 5.6 and a 5.4, both 20 km north east of Siglufjörður; and, on 21/06/2020, a 5.8 30 km north, north east of Siglufjörður.  The day before the swarm started there was a small earthquake with a depth of 92.3 km, which is unusually deep for the area.

 IMO is in the process of manually confirming the earthquakes – a mammoth task!  We have updated our earthquake data set up to 28 June 2020 based on the earthquakes confirmed so far in order to take a look at the swarm.  In the area, 65.25°N, 21.5°W to 67.25°N, 15.0°W, 2,010 earthquakes from 1 June 2020 to 28 June 2020 were available to download.

Statistics so far

Fig 1: Summary of earthquakes for 1 June 2020 to 28 June 2020 by the author; © All rights reserved 2020.  A later download may give a more comprehensive picture.

Updated earthquake plots

Our plot for month 54 (1 June 2020 to 28 June 2020) shows that the swarm is occurring on the western end of the TFZ, near the junction of the Eyjafjarðaráll Rift and the Húsavík-Flatey Fault.

Fig 2.1:   Earthquakes 1 June 2020 to date in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone by the author. Green dots denote earthquakes less than 2.0M; yellow circles, quakes between 2.0M and 3.0M; red stars, quakes over 3M; orange triangles, volcanoes or volcanic features. Image on the right is a zoom in on the current earthquake swarm. © All rights reserved, 2020.
Fig 2.2:  Earthquakes 1 January 2016 to 28 June 2020 in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone by the author. Green dots denote earthquakes less than 2.0M; yellow circles, quakes between 2.0M and 3.0M; red stars, quakes over 3M; orange triangles, volcanoes or volcanic features. Red ellipse indicates the location of the current swarm. © All rights reserved, 2020.

So what is going on?

Prior to this swarm, most activity in our data set from 1 January 2016 had been on the Grímsey Oblique Rift and Húsavík-Flatey Fault, with a large swarm occurring to the north west of Grímsey in February 2018 (see our earlier post).  The current swarm appears to be the western end of the system catching up. 

This swarm is, however, relatively deep for oceanic crust.  Whether or not there is any associated volcanic or geothermal activity remains to be seen. 

The swarm on the Reykjanes Peninsular that started in late 2019 is still ongoing, albeit at a reduced rate. Are the two swarms linked? The obvious answer is yes – they are both on transform fault systems which accommodate the spreading from the Mid Atlantic Ridge as it crosses Iceland. But is there more to it? Possibly, the crust could be fracturing to accommodate other activity in Iceland – e.g. uplift from the mantle plume. If yes, we may see some more activity e.g. in the vicinity of the Vatnajökull Icecap in the next few months. But we’ll have to wait until the real experts opine.

For updates, please consult IMO.

The Armchair Volcanologist

29 June 2020.

Source for earthquake data: Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO): https://en.vedur.is

Plots are the author’s own work.

© Copyright remains with the author; all rights reserved, 2020

Seismic Activity in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone

Good Afternoon!

It’s back to Iceland to finish off a post I started before being diverted by the earthquake swarm in Nevada.

Having looked at the recent activity at the Reykjanes Peninsula, let’s now look at the Tjörnes Fracture Zone, where the Mid Atlantic Ridge leaves Iceland to head northwards.  Here, current seismic activity is predominantly tectonic.   Our study is based on the same data set used for the introduction to Iceland and the Reykjanes Peninsula (earthquake data downloaded from the Icelandic Meteorological Office(1) from January 2016 to April 12, 2020, updated to May 3, 2020).

Fig 1: Earthquakes in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone Region from January 2016 to April 12, 2020, plotted by the author.  NVB is the Northern Volcanic Belt.  © Copyright remains with the author, all rights reserved, 2020.

Geological Setting

The Tjörnes Fracture Zone (TFZ) is a complex area of transform and extensional faulting connecting the Kolbeinsey Ridge, the Western Volcanic Zone and the Northern Volcanic Zone.  The Kolbeinsey Ridge, itself, is slow spreading at a rate of 10mm per year.  The main faults in the area are: the EyjaFjarðaráll Rift, the Húsavík-Flatey Fault (the TFZ, itself), the Grímsey Oblique Rift and the Dalvik Fault.  Both hydrothermal and seismic activity cluster on the faults. The Húsavík-Flatey Fault has produced earthquakes with magnitudes in the region of 7.0.

Grímsey is an inhabited island on the Arctic Circle. Its main industries are fishing and tourism(2).

Fig 2: Grímsey Cliffs.  Cropped from an image by MosheA, published under CC BY-SA 2.5

Flatey is a small island in Skjálfandi Bay in northern Iceland. It is inhabited in the summer for the tourist season, being home to puffins, terns whimbrels and plovers, amongst others(3).

According to GVP(4) a submarine eruption occurred in 1868 on the Manareyjar Ridge, north of Manareyjar Island, at the south eastern end of the system; the lavas were basalt / picro basalt.  A submarine eruption or dyke intrusion in 1999 caused an earthquake swarm 180km north of Grimsey and 100km north of Kolbeinsey Island on the Southern Kolbeinsey Ridge.  Volcanic activity occurred in 1372 and 1755, but its whereabouts is unclear.

Seismic Activity

In the period from January 2016 to May 3, 2020, there were 26,762 earthquakes reported by the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO)(2) for the region. 131 earthquakes had a magnitude of 3.0 or more; 67 occurred in month 26 (February 2018) on the Skajálfandadujúp Rift, 52 miles ENE of Grímsey, the largest of which was 5.21M.

Fig 3: Earthquakes in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone Region, February 2018, plotted by the author.  Black stars denote earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or more; blue triangles are the approximate locations of volcanoes or volcanic islands. © Copyright remains with the author, all rights reserved, 2020.

A depth plot of the February 2018 swarm shows that most earthquakes over 3.0M occur in the lithosphere.

Fig 4: Depth v Longitude plot of earthquakes April 2018. Green dots denote earthquakes less than 2.0M, yellow circles denote earthquakes over 2.0M; red stars denote earthquakes over 3.0M; blue triangles are the approximate locations of volcanoes or volcanic islands.  © Copyright remains with the author, all rights reserved, 2020.

According to IMO, these swarms have occurred before; the most recent being in May & September 1969, December 1980, September 1988 and April 2013.  The data for most of the earlier swarms is not publicly available on IMO’s website, but we can get data for the April 2013 swarm.  In that swarm, there were 84 earthquakes with a magnitude of 3 or more; the largest of which had a magnitude of 5.37.

Fig 5: Earthquakes in the Tjörnes Fracture Zone Region April 2013, plotted by the author.  Black stars denote earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or more; blue triangles are the approximate locations of volcanoes or volcanic islands. © Copyright remains with the author, all rights reserved, 2020.

A depth plot of this swarm shows that most earthquakes over 3.0M also occurred in the lithosphere.

Fig 6: Depth v Longitude plot of earthquakes in the April 2013 swarm. Yellow circles denote earthquakes over 2.0M; red stars denote earthquakes over 3.0M; the blue triangle is the approximate location of Grímsey. © Copyright remains with the author, all rights reserved, 2020

How does this compare to the activity on the Reykjanes Peninsula? 

In the Tjörnes Fracture Zone, most seismic activity is occurring in the lithosphere. There is no reported volcanic activity associated with the two swarms we looked. 

Apart from the recent large swarm, the Reykjanes Peninsula shows much less activity in the same period; again, most activity was in the lithosphere. The recent swarm, itself, was atypical (still ongoing at the time of writing, but at a reduced rate) and accompanied by ground uplift – hence the increased monitoring put in place there.

I am not Icelandic so apologies for any typos in Icelandic names.

The Armchair Volcanologist

29 May 2020

© Copyright remains with the author; all rights reserved, 2020

References & Further Reading:

  1. Icelandic Meteorological Office: https://en.vedur.is
  2. Grímsey: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grímsey
  3. Flatey, Skjálfandi: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatey,_Skjálfandi
  4. Smithsonian Institution Natural History Museum Global Volcanism Program (GVP): https://volcano.si.edu
  5. “Present Kinematics of the Tjörnes Fracture Zone North Iceland, from campaign and continuous GPS measurements”, Sabrina Metzger, Sigurjón Jónsson, Gillis Danielsen, Sigrún Hreinsdóttir, François Jouanne,Domenico Giardini, Thierry Villemin, Geophysical Journal International, Volume 192, Issue 2, 1 February 2013, Pages 441–455, https://doi.org/10.1093/gji/ggs032

Credits:

Raw earthquake data downloaded from the Icelandic Met Office: https://en.vedur.is

Plots are the author’s own work.